A review of six TV shows and movies that captured fans – The Rattler

LARRY RODRIGUEZ-SHEA – SPORTS EDITOR

(Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios.) “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier” is the latest Marvel TV show to be released on Disney +. After the success of “WandaVision”, the series has a lot to do and it certainly is in the first two episodes. The show plays out in the style of a James Bond crime thriller right through to the end credits, echoing the theme of “Law and Order”.

The show is full of social commentary that is both relevant and powerful. Additionally, the series does a great deal of fan service, creating parallels with moments in Marvel cinematic history and comics. The show is also certainly more serious and grown-up than anything Marvel has ever done. Finally, the second episode ends on a cliffhanger that the audience could appreciate. Overall, if the first two episodes are any sign of what’s to come, it looks like Marvel has yet another perfect recipe in their book.

(Photo courtesy of Netflix.) “Ginny and Georgia” is a Netflix Original seeking to capitalize on trends of the time. This mashup follows the lives of two women, teenage Ginny (Antonia Gentry) and her mother Georgia (Brianne Howey). The family recently moved to a new town after Ginny’s stepfather died. The show is part a small town murder mystery, part a young adult drama, part a sitcom, part this and part that. It doesn’t end with its theme as a mashup of tropes from multiple TV shows.

The first show that comes to mind as a borrowed trope is “Euphoria”, for its dramatic performance from high school. “Ginny and Georgia” first exploded for presenting a sexist joke about Taylor Swift that garnered her mass attention and quickly inflated the Netflix charts. Sometimes the show is perfect for an adult looking to watch some scorching drama, but the next scene comments on complex issues like fatherhood and race relations in America through a lens better suited to a teenager.

From the start, Ginny’s life is paralleled with Georgia’s life, showing us that the mother-daughter couple are more alike than they seem. The story excels best at telling about Ginny’s coming of age. Though heavily dramatized, the show grapples with cautious questions of race, identity, and sexuality. Yet, as a teenager, Ginny has to deal with these issues to the extreme. She has to navigate a “progressive utopia,” as Ginny puts it, to a place where she should feel welcome but with which she constantly disagrees. This show at first glance looks like another teen drama, until it doesn’t, which then becomes a murder mystery.

(Photo courtesy of Amazon Studios.) Eddie Murphy was at one point the undisputed king of comedy, made famous for his X-rated “Raw” comedy special and his prominence on Saturday Night Live. He’s back on the big screen as King Akeem of Zamunda. The film is aware of his age, and his jokes land here and there. In an almost ironic self-awareness, the film even pokes fun at itself for the fact that it’s a sequel no one was asking for. The film is cheesy and has its fair share of dead moments. The story he tells is cliché, recycling the central themes of the original. Additionally, the film draws on the nostalgia and acting prowess of its actors to carry the film. Overall the movie is “just ok” without the charm of the original but still worth a look.

(Photo courtesy of Netflix.) “I Care a Lot” is an exciting thriller distributed by Netflix. Marla Grayson (Rosamund Pike) is a ruthless caretaker for the elderly. His character is meant to be hated. She’s not even an anti-hero at all from the start – she’s just plain evil. Her partner in crime is Fran (Eiza Gonzalez) who plays her role well. The “villain” of the film is Roman Lunyov (Peter Dinklage) and he performs his role perfectly to a point where the viewer may not know who they should hate the most.

The story basically boils down to one of the state-granted wards of Grayson being overtaken by shady individuals. What follows is a mysterious thriller. The premise of the film is strange, but its societal commentary is not. The film makes a lot of obvious comments about capitalism, feminism, and American society. One part that is easy to miss in all depth is the commentary on the exploitation of others.

This movie is full of tongue-in-cheek commentary and subtle commentary, and there’s a stark contrast between audiences and critics with this one. Much of the disconnect seems to come from the lack of a “hero” to root for. So don’t expect a happy movie with an even happier ending; that’s not even the case, as all the characters are rude in their own way. Like many other thrillers, it can feel like a slow burn at times, but in the end, the movie sucks audiences in with Pike’s devilish performance.

(Photo courtesy of Netflix.) “I Care a Lot” is an exciting thriller distributed by Netflix. Marla Grayson (Rosamund Pike) is a ruthless caretaker for the elderly. His character is meant to be hated. She’s not even an anti-hero at all from the start – she’s just plain evil. Her partner in crime is Fran (Eiza Gonzalez) who plays her role well. The “villain” of the film is Roman Lunyov (Peter Dinklage) and he performs his role perfectly to a point where the viewer may not know who they should hate the most.

The story basically boils down to one of the state-granted wards of Grayson being overtaken by shady individuals. What follows is a mysterious thriller. The premise of the film is strange, but its societal commentary is not. The film makes a lot of obvious comments about capitalism, feminism, and American society. One part that is easy to miss in all depth is the commentary on the exploitation of others.

This movie is full of tongue-in-cheek commentary and subtle commentary, and there’s a stark contrast between audiences and critics with this one. Much of the disconnect seems to come from the lack of a “hero” to root for. So don’t expect a happy movie with an even happier ending; that’s not even the case, as all the characters are rude in their own way. Like many other thrillers, it can feel like a slow burn at times, but in the end, the movie sucks audiences in with Pike’s devilish performance.

(Photo courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures.) Zack Snyder’s “Justice League,” known as the Snyder Cut, is an artistic masterpiece. There is a lot to unwrap with this film as many are unaware of the legend that surrounds how this film finally made its way to audiences.

“Justice League” made its public debut in 2017. Her death was mass criticism. The original cut for the film came from director Joss Whedon, who picked up the film in post-production shortly after Snyder left production due to the suicide of his daughters in March 2017. At this point, details are unclear. . Apparently Snyder had finished part of the movie, but he wasn’t ready for the audience. The studio demanded a two-hour release of the film by November, so it was remade by Whedon – and what came out was not at all close to Snyder’s original vision, or what fans have been getting. seen in the trailers. There followed a massive fan campaign pushing to release the “Snyder Cut”.

Snyder, known for “Watchmen” and “300,” had created the universe to be dark, gritty, and almost a rejection of Marvel style. Fast forward to 2020, AT&T pushed Warner Brothers to release the movie’s “Snyder Cut” on HBO Max in its original four-hour run with Snyder returning to complete production.

From the opening scene, this film is tonally and distinctly different, abandoning the original and rather controversial CGI scene starring Henry Cavill’s Superman. Snyder’s opening scene is more powerful because the 4: 9 aspect ratio movie frame immediately sets the movie up to have more emotion, gravity, and direction.

The film also exhibits a drastically different color quality. This is especially noticeable in the final battle where the bright red sky is recolored to be darker. Actors and characters also benefit from the extended runtime. Victor Stone / Cyborg (Ray Fisher) and Barry Allen / Flash (Ezra Miller) are enjoying this new cut enormously. Flash retains its role of comedic relief, but its personality and its jokes are infinitely nicer. Fisher’s Cyborg becomes the soul of the film and receives a meaningful and moving story. In the original, his character was largely forgettable and the actor was criticized for his misinterpretation; all that feeling is gone in this cut. Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot) rightly gets an enhanced role. The original cut saw her as Batman’s love interest and her character lacked the power and presence that she clearly displays in this version. In one scene, villainous Steppenwolf (Ciaran Hinds) mocks Wonder Woman with the statement, “This one’s mine.” But fiercely, she retaliates: “I don’t belong to anyone.

Speaking of main villains, they feel like real villains in this cut. Darkseid (Ray Porter) and Steppenwolf bring the conflict to life. Steppenwolf benefits greatly from this cut with a dramatic change in armor and a fierce demeanor. Darkseid wasn’t even in the original but offers a major scene.

Tonally, the film abandons certain musical choices and opts for a darker and more emotional score, which elevates the characterization and the atmosphere. Even Aquaman (Jason Momoa) gets a dark lead from Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds to sell his character’s emotional turmoil. Yet the character who redeems himself the most is Joker (Jared Leto). Although Leto is only onscreen for a brief moment, his raw conversation with Batman (Ben Affleck) is what fans have hoped for all along. The biggest upgrade comes when Superman pulls out his black suit, a nod to the comics.

The four-hour Snyder Cut runtime is conveniently sliced ​​into seven parts, almost like a seven-part miniseries. However, if one chooses to watch everything at once, the time will be barely noticeable because the film is a pure artistic vision. Snyder’s ultimate vision for the DC films would have been a five-part Justice League franchise of epic proportions. But again, this movie was largely aimed at the fan service audience.


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